Let’s compare with Forex trading. One of the key component is the Risk Management. Which is how many are you ready to loose for each trade. If you structure well your approach you would never go to any trade were you plan to have a ratio less than 1:1. Meaning you can loose 100$ if your target is to reach at least 100$ positive. Often you are more looking for 1:2 or 1:3. You can decide your return.
It is up to you to ultimately determine which type of asset is best for you. You first need to evaluate your level of experience. Do you have experience with the Forex market and are looking for a new and more profitable way to trade? If this applies to you, you will easily be able to apply your strategies to the binary options market. Or does your expertise come from day trading? Are you looking to rid yourself of some of the risk involved in day trading? Then binary options can certainly benefit you as you have the ability to focus on those assets with which you are most familiar.
Hey! Tomorrow I am planning on making my first deposit. There is one broker I have decided on, but I wanted to get some other opinions on them first to make sure. The reason I picked this broker is because they accept bitcoin, not all brokers do. So I wanted to know if anyone uses any broker that accepts bitcoin and successfully withdrawals from them. Many brokers have pretty good reviews, but just wanna chat with anyone who used them. Any input?
If we denote by S the FOR/DOM exchange rate (i.e., 1 unit of foreign currency is worth S units of domestic currency) we can observe that paying out 1 unit of the domestic currency if the spot at maturity is above or below the strike is exactly like a cash-or nothing call and put respectively. Similarly, paying out 1 unit of the foreign currency if the spot at maturity is above or below the strike is exactly like an asset-or nothing call and put respectively. Hence if we now take {\displaystyle r_{\mathrm {FOR} }} , the foreign interest rate, {\displaystyle r_{DOM}} , the domestic interest rate, and the rest as above, we get the following results.
Binary options "are based on a simple 'yes' or 'no' proposition: Will an underlying asset be above a certain price at a certain time?"[20] Traders place wagers as to whether that will or will not happen. If a customer believes the price of an underlying asset will be above a certain price at a set time, the trader buys the binary option, but if he or she believes it will be below that price, they sell the option. In the U.S. exchanges, the price of a binary is always under $100.[20]
×